The Russian authorities imposed on Apple a fine of $33,900 for allegedly breaking the law that requires data iCloud local users are stored on servers located in the country.

Russia introduced the law in September 2015, and it was reported at the time thatApple had partnered with a local data center in order to comply. Then, in 2019, it was claimed that Apple was then only about to comply.

Apple still doesn’t follow Russian storage laws data online, and has now been fined because of it. A Moscow court imposed a fine of two million rubles (about $33,900) to Apple.

No further details of the case were released. It is therefore not known whether it is a single fine, or whether Apple will continue to be fined as long as they continue to break the law.

However, the company has already repeatedly complied with Russian laws and requirements. She recently deactivated Private Relay for Russian users, for example, and was the first major tech company to open a local office in Moscow. Separately, Apple was sued by a Russian law firm for suspending Apple Pay in the country.

Data storage: why Apple was condemned by Russia?

A Moscow court has fined Apple 2 million rubles (about 34,000 euros) for refusing to store the data of Russian citizens on its territory. The company that has already decided to stop selling its products in the country — in response to the war in Ukraine.

MOSCOW ALONE AGAINST TECH GIANTS

Since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, big tech companies have been reluctant to comply with Russian demands, especially on issues related to censorship and data control. However, despite Apple’s categorical refusal in Russia, it appears that the company is complying with similar requests in China.

Apple administers and operates a dozen data centers around the world, some of which are in China. Following a change in legislation passed in 2016, Apple had to house all of its Chinese user data in data centers in the country.

A RISK FOR APPLE’S DATA IN CHINA?

These servers are administered by Guizhou Cloud Big Data (GCBD), a company controlled by the Chinese province of Guizhou and partly uses the cloud service of China Telecom, which is a Chinese state-owned operator. Apple, however, claims to use encryption keys so that the Chinese government does not have access to it.

Apple has come under particular criticism for the move from some privacy advocates who say the government could still intercept data stored in iCloud.

But here, the reason why Apple refused Russia’s request seems to have to do with the fact that the country led by Vladimir Putin would have made requests that were far too “invasive” for Apple’s taste, hence its refusal in this case. accurate.

Apple fined in Russia for refusing to install iCloud servers in the country

The Russian authorities have just imposed on Apple a fine of $33,900, a sanction that originated in Cupertino’s refusal to store Russian user data on iCloud servers based in Russia. The Russian law requiring foreign companies to store Russian user data locally dates back to 2015, and for 7 years, Apple has been constantly slowing down its compliance process. Some analysts estimated three years ago that Apple was very close to submitting to Russian law, but in the end nothing happened.

A priori, it seems rather logical that the fine be renewed (or even increased) if Apple continues to rebel against the laws in force in the country ruled with an iron fist by Vladimir Putin, but no information has yet confirmed this hypothesis. . Cupertino lawyers therefore have their work cut out for them in Russia despite Apple’s withdrawal from the country since the invasion in Ukraine. On this subject and as a reminder, Apple is being sued (by a Russian legal firm) for the withdrawal of Apple Pay in Russia.

Russia fines Apple

Russian authorities have just fined Apple $33,900 for refusing to store data on Russian servers.

Russia requires Apple to store iCloud data relating to Russian citizens on local servers. Apple apparently refused to comply, based on an Interfax report.

Russian law of 2015 obliges foreign companies to store Russian user data locally. For 7 years, Apple has constantly slowed down its compliance process. Some analysts believed, three years ago, that Apple was very close to submitting to Russian law, but without conclusive results.

2 million rubles

The Russian court fined Apple 2 million rubles (worth around $34,000) for non-compliance. In general, Russian courts are increasingly faced with issues of content censorship and data control since the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

The amount of the fine is obviously something to smile about since it is an amount equivalent to a properly configured Mac Pro.

Single or recurring fine?

At first glance, it seems rather logical that the fine will be renewed (and even increased) if Apple continues to circumvent the laws in force in the country led by Vladimir Putin, but no information has yet confirmed this hypothesis.

Cupertino lawyers therefore have plenty to do in Russia despite Apple’s withdrawal from the country since the invasion in Ukraine.

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