[REVIEW] : Matter and antimatter interact in the same way with gravity

Antimatter and matter react in the same way to gravity. They even fall with the same acceleration in the absence of frictional forces, CERN found in its antimatter factory. These steps could lead to new physics.

An experiment at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) based in Geneva showed that antimatter reacts to gravity in the same way as matter.

This evidence was confirmed by precise measurements carried out on the movements of antiprotons and protons, two particles which represent the matter-antimatter duality: the antiproton is the antiparticle of the proton.

The measurements also provide the best confirmation to date that the antiproton conforms to some aspect of the Standard Model of particle physics, as stated in a statement from the Riken Institute of Japan.

Matter and antimatter create some of the most interesting problems in physics today, explains the journal PhysicWorld.

EQUIVALENTS, BUT & MLDR;

Matter and antimatter are essentially equivalent, except that when a particle has a positive charge, its antiparticle has a negative charge. In other respects, they seem equivalent.

However, one of the great mysteries of physics today is that, although they seem equivalent, the universe is apparently made up of matter, with very little antimatter.

Ever since the existence of antimatter was theorized in 1928 by English physicist Paul Dirac, scientists have tried to find something different between the two, which might explain why we exist.

As part of this research, they explored whether matter and antimatter interact with gravity in the same way, or whether antimatter experiences gravity in a different way than matter, which would violate the principle of equivalence d’Einstein.

Matter and antimatter interact in the same way with gravity

Antimatter and matter react in the same way to gravity. They even fall with the same acceleration in the absence of frictional forces, CERN found in its antimatter factory. These steps could lead to new physics.

An experiment at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) based in Geneva showed that antimatter reacts to gravity in the same way as matter.

This evidence was confirmed by precise measurements carried out on the movements of antiprotons and protons, two particles which represent the matter-antimatter duality: the antiproton is the antiparticle of the proton.

The measurements also provide the best confirmation to date that the antiproton conforms to some aspect of the Standard Model of particle physics, as stated in a statement from the Riken Institute of Japan.

Matter and antimatter create some of the most interesting problems in physics today, explains the journal PhysicWorld.

EQUIVALENTS, BUT & MLDR;

Matter and antimatter are essentially equivalent, except that when a particle has a positive charge, its antiparticle has a negative charge. In other respects, they seem equivalent.

However, one of the great mysteries of physics today is that, although they seem equivalent, the universe is apparently made up of matter, with very little antimatter.

Ever since the existence of antimatter was theorized in 1928 by English physicist Paul Dirac, scientists have tried to find something different between the two, which might explain why we exist.

As part of this research, they explored whether matter and antimatter interact with gravity in the same way, or whether antimatter experiences gravity in a different way than matter, which would violate the principle of equivalence d’Einstein.

Proof of the principle of weak equivalence | RIKEN.

SAME RESPONSE

Matter is made up of baryons and leptons, like protons and electrons. According to the Standard Model, each of these particles has a corresponding antiparticle of identical mass, but opposite charge.

Like protons and electrons, these antiparticles can combine to produce antimatter, which CERN is doing in its own facility called the “Antimatter Factory”.

The experiment at CERN was developed as part of the international BASE collaboration and consisted of trapping antiprotons and negative hydrogen ions using electric and magnetic fields.

The BASE experiment at CERN aims to measure the magnetic moment of the antiproton with very high precision, in order to be able to compare it with the magnetic moment of the proton.

This experiment showed, within strict limits, that antimatter reacts to gravity in the same way as matter.

DIRECT TEST

This result represents the most precise direct evidence of a fundamental symmetry between matter and antimatter, achieved with particles made up of three quarks, called baryons, and their antiparticles, according to the researchers.

The experiment also tested the principle of weak equivalence, which is a consequence of Einstein’s theories of relativity.

This principle says that the behavior of an object in a gravitational field is independent of its intrinsic properties, including its mass, in the absence of frictional forces.

A familiar example of this principle is that, in a vacuum, a feather and a hammer fall freely with the same acceleration.

IDENTICAL ACCELERATION

Keep in mind, however, that the Earth’s orbit around the Sun is elliptical, so gravity changes slightly over the course of a year. The authors of this research found that the frequencies of protons and antiprotons register this slight variation in gravity.

The team thus confirmed that the principle of weak equivalence applies to both antimatter and matter, so that the gravitational acceleration of matter and antimatter is the same.

The researchers note that while BASE did not deposit antimatter directly into Earth’s gravitational field, its measure of the influence of gravity on an antimatter particle is conceptually very similar, indicating that it does not there is no abnormal interaction between antimatter and gravity.

Stefan Ulmer, director of this complex research, says these measurements could lead to new physics.

For the future, other experiments at CERN plan to test the principle of low equivalence by observing free-falling antimatter.

Matter and antimatter: unprecedented results on their differences

CERN has been an expert for decades in the production and especially the long-term storage of antiprotons. This allows him to do many experiments to try to solve some of the puzzles related to the discovery of antimatter, as shown in the video above which mentions for example Alpha et Aegis. It also shows and explains that antiprotons are produced from hydrogen nuclei accelerated by the Synchrotron à protons and sent to a fixed target where collisions with other nuclei will create new particles. The Standard Model of high energy physics tells us that as much matter as antimatter must have been produced during the Big Bang when the particles that make them up – fermions and leptons – were immersed in a bath of photons and d ” other force-mediating particles, including the famous bosons of Bread-Englert-Higgs.

This mixture was at very high temperatures so that each of these particles participated in reactions of creation and annihilation of the others. But when the expansion of space brought the temperature down, annihilations took over the creations and still according to the standard model, the particles of matter and antimatter should have disappeared by combining, leaving only photons. This is obviously not the case.

There must therefore be differences between the possible reactions with particles of matter and those with particles of antimatter, a difference that physicists and in particular those of CERN track down with antiparticles and even anti-hydrogen atoms.

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