The Predator follows Alien and Terminator franchises.

Wouter has had to watch with sorrow how ‘flexible’ franchises such as The Terminator and Alien became production monsters of Frankenstein over the years. In what state did The Predator falter from the lab?

As soon as one plummets past thirty, it seems as if people prefer and more often think back to bygone times, when they were hip and could still enjoy entertainment without worry. Hollywood has been doing its best for years to serve these people by capitalizing on this nostalgia, with varying results. It is not always a good idea to film a board game or toy franchise of yesteryear (Battleship, Max Steel), coming much too late with sequels to 90’s films (Independence Day: Resurgence, Basic Instinct 2) or toppers from the 80’s (Point Break, Conan The Barbarian, The Thing, Red Dawn, Robocop, Dirty Dancing, Clash of the Titans, The A-Team, The Karate Kid, Poltergeist, etc., etc). The Predator is such a franchise that has been used for decades, just like The Terminator and Alien, simply because the original is an 80’s classic on which an endless franchise can be built perfectly. But is that a nice development for the film-loving person?

The Predator follows Alien and Terminator franchises

Previously on The Predator

Ff a Predator history lesson laced with my opinion. The first 1987 film starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Predator, is an action classic to me. Not yet at the lonely height of a Terminator 2 or Die Hard (the latter is from the same director, by the way), but still a powerful ‘alien vs tough men in the jungle’ film, which injects as much gore as testosterone in your face. Predator 2 came out in 1990 and brought the action to LA, which I think worked out pretty well, but I barely remember this movie and should watch it again to form a real opinion. I’d like to forget about the Alien vs Predator franchise very quickly, because those two films managed to kill almost 2 fantastic franchises with stupid plots, clichéd dialogues and easy action, so we move on to Predators from 2010. This film by Nimród Antal had a lot of good ideas, but makes the mistake many remakes, late sequels, and movies based on old franchises make: it wants too much and is too hard. Will The Predator bring things back to the basics?

The Predator, Shane Black style

This time it’s Shane Black’s turn to bring the -faced alien to the silver screen, and since the director of Iron Man 3, The Nice Guys and the Lethal Weapon series, among others, starred in the first Predator, is that kind of funny. But to say that he has formed a brilliant vision… It all starts out nice with a kind of 30 minute remake of the original film, in the jungle with a team of tough soldiers and everything, but unfortunately it doesn’t stay that simple. Completely in line with many modern blockbusters that run off with an old (er) franchise, one useless element after another is soon introduced, slowly culminating in a huge mashed jar. We are really talking about a cluster along the lines of Alien: Covenant and Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, because there is so much unnecessary and illogical about the script that at one point, along with my equally surprised neighbor, I wild was gesticulating and confused in the screening room.

The Predator follows Alien and Terminator franchises

The Predator: This is everyone

Once the ditch of characters are introduced in The Predator, the amount of jokes triples, as does the confusion. Protagonist Quinn McKenna (Boyd Holbrook, the pretty boy-bad guy from Logan) gathers a whole team of crazy soldiers around him, including hyperactive prankster Coyle (cameo king Keegan-Michael Key), Tourette-suffering Baxley (Thomas Jane who best funny is when he spontaneously wants his face by a porcupine) and dangerously relaxed Nebraska (a cool Trevante Rhodes). There are two more crazy ones, but I also have to talk about scientist / bad chick Casey (Olivia Munn) who gets out of clothes no less than twice, good housewife Emily (Yvonne Strahovski, who I always have a warm heart for thanks to her role in Mass Effect 2), deceptively lovable villain Treager (Sterling K. Brown) and oh yeah, there’s a baby boy, Rory (Jacob Tremblay, the child prodigy from Room). It’s a busy place and everyone has a moment with their face on camera, but this extremely extensive cast already indicates that Shane Black didn’t kill any darlings while writing the script …

The Big Daddy Predator

Much of The Predator is fast and funny -as a blockbuster should-, but if you don’t have your brain completely on zero, many, many questions will arise. “How does Quinn manage to open a door to an alien ship so quickly?” “How did they suddenly get choppers in the middle of an army base?” “Why is Big Daddy Predator’s CGI so badly bad?” Moreover, I regularly wondered if I had missed a shot, because during some action scenes the editing simply doesn’t seem to be completely chronological. The third act is so chaotic, vague and wants so many things at once, that you keep your hand constantly. It is yet another film that wants to attract people with the scent of nostalgia, then chase them away again because the simplicity of the original is nowhere to be found under all those useless characters, bad editing, an abundance of mediocre ideas and layers of ugly CGI. Predator is an ‘alien vs tough men in the jungle’ movie, this is an ‘an alien, big alien and dog aliens vs too large group of crazy soldiers, a fighting smart lady with no fighting experience and an autistic boy vs a military bad guy, soldiers and some scientists including Jake Bussey ‘… with a lot of blood and jokes.

The Predator follows Alien and Terminator franchises

Conclusion

The Predator follows Alien and Terminator franchises

SCORE:

55 The Predator acts as difficult as an Alien: Covenant of Independence Day: Resurgence and is therefore clumsy, disorderly and directionless, but has enough gore and jokes to keep viewers somewhat captivated. It’s like bumper cars: they don’t go anywhere, but colliding is rude and fun. The Predator acts as difficult as an Alien: Covenant of Independence Day: Resurgence and is therefore clumsy, disorderly and directionless, but has enough gore and jokes to keep viewers somewhat captivated. It’s like bumper cars: they don’t go anywhere, but colliding is rude and fun.