A few days ago, Bandai Namco brought together the press and prominent members of the distribution channel at the Madrid College of Architects for its annual Level Up event. There were, however, a couple of differences compared to previous years: this time each country had its own own event, and in Namco they took the opportunity to explain the philosophy behind their new name change – Bandai Namco Entertainment – which we can summarize in something that all the big Japanese companies are learning the hard way: we have a lot of licenses, the Japan is no longer what it was and we must pamper Westerners more. And in the synergies, of course, that the animes drag videogames, these in reverse, and that the licenses feed each other.

Bandai has relied on two legs for this change in philosophy: its traditional Japanese licenses, both its own – Tales of Zestiria, and the announcement of a new installment of that polyamory between Capcom, Namco and Sega that was Project X Zone – as based on manga and anime, and agreements to distribute and / or produce more western games, with the sublime The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt at the helm and the imminent Project Cars (May 7 on PC, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One), or collaborations with Milestone (who, apart from his Moto GP 15, have an interesting Sebastian Loeb Rally EVO in their hands) and a Codemasters F1 2015 (of which we will bring you a preview tomorrow) with a graphics engine worthy of the current generation of consoles. But let’s review the catalog a bit, especially the ones that let us try, to see where the shots go …

Naruto Shippuden Ultimate Ninja Storm 4

We already gave it a good review a couple of days ago, but it never hurts to remember that Cyberconnect 2 will debut in the new generation with a complete review of the series with about 120 different fighters. It will be available on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC sometime this year.

We attended the Bandai Namco Level Up event in Madrid

J-Stars Victory Vs +

Shonen Jump magazine has been publishing manga of worldwide success for 45 years: Dragon Ball, Naruto, One Piece, Saint Seiya and many others. That is, the source of most of Bandai Namco’s video game licenses. Such a vein already has four titles in Japan in the style of Super Smash Bros. so that the main figures of each manga split each other’s heads, and Bandai has decided that it is time to release a delivery in the West. The combat style here moves away from the original Smash Bros. to propose something closer to the current Dragon Balls: a 3D scenario where couples of protagonists (plus support fighters) face each other in a riotous versus of magic and combos everywhere . Basically, it is a fist rave where the most nostalgic will be able to enjoy the presence of characters such as Kenshiro (Hokuto no Ken), Arale (Dr. Slump) or Yusuke (Yu Yu Hakusho), facing the best known Goku, Naruto or Luffy . The novelty in the West is that it will also arrive -on June 26- for PlayStation 4, in addition to the original PlayStation 3.

We attended the Bandai Namco Level Up event in Madrid

Godzilla

Controlling Godzilla gets really weird (spinning with L1 and R1, like it’s a tank), until you understand what Natsume Atari is trying to do with this kaijus simulator: reproduce the rough action from the movies, and you can forget that the camera must always be above the giant lizard hump plates. The affection that each little detail exudes is enough to melt any fan of Toho movies with pleasure: Mothra flaps as if hanging by threads, and the critters move more like guys in rubber suits than 3D reimagines of the concepts. In the demo we redeveloped half of downtown Tokyo – everything, absolutely everything, can be pulverized – while we faced both the three-headed King Ghidorah and the insufferable Space Godzilla. Macroherpedophilic love is summed up with a single example: Godzilla’s roar is already, in itself, a special attack. From there, everything else is pure Japanese B-series. And, since we are talking about video games, it smells like the legendary Simple 2000 from D3, but with staging of PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 4. On sale on July 17.

We attended the Bandai Namco Level Up event in Madrid

Saint Seiya Soldier’s Soul

No, it is not a From Software game despite its name, but a new versus from DIMPS full of brilli-brilli and exploding cosmos that wants to take advantage of the fact that there is a new Saint Seiya anime on the way, with the Golden Knights as protagonists . From the fight he presented to us – they didn’t let us play it – Ryo Mito, his producer, we could see Leo Aioria in divine armor beating Seiya in bronze armor with a huge beating. It seems deeper than Brave Soldiers, and it remains to be seen how many ideas from Dragon Ball Xenoverse – aside from an emphasis on aerial combat – reuse DIMPS. It will be out on PlayStation 3, PC and PlayStation 4 (where it sports some pretty nice cel-shading, at 1080p and 60FPS) in a few months.

We attended the Bandai Namco Level Up event in Madrid

One Piece Pirate Warriors 3

There is no one who understands Koei with the Warriors / Musou: those of the original series – Dinasty Warriors – are increasingly infamous and old, anchored more and more in their origins – and failures, as enemies that disappear – of PS2; while those of license – the one of Zelda for Wii U, for example – suppose evolutionary leaps in the series. One Piece Pirate Warriors 3 is the perfect example that Warriors (“games whose instruction manual should be a poster with a giant X button”, as Tim Rogers used to say) are better when supervised by other people: the combos are original and fluid , the graphics look no longer 15 years old and the overall dynamics (in the demo we played a fairly small map, a blessing for a game that consists of beating thousands of minions and several bosses per minute) is as entertaining as it is addictive. If you are looking for a Warriors for PlayStation 4, start here: Pirate Warriors 3 collects all the action of the previous two games and adds new characters, combos and a mechanic of support fighters in which finally it takes full advantage of a casting that does not it has waste. Am I a fan of the Warriors? Yes. Am I a fan of One Piece? Not much. Sounds like the best Musou I’ve had in years? Without a doubt. And I can’t think of a better compliment for a licensed game. It will arrive in August on PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4 and PC.

We attended the Bandai Namco Level Up event in Madrid

We attended the Bandai Namco Level Up event in Madrid